Showing posts tagged racism

“We have come such a long, long way, we have. We have elected a black man president of the United States, and forget that the political opposition has treated him like an unruly footman despite his best efforts to be a conciliator, a living witness to a country absolved. But, from a distance, that is not the conclusion the honest person can draw from what is going on in Missouri now. The honest conclusion to be drawn from what is going on in Missouri now is that we may have reached the limits of the American idea, of the American dream, of the American experiment. This country, it is fair to conclude, cannot exist without some manifestation of its fundamental racial divide. Slavery, followed by Reconstruction, followed by American apartheid, followed by the Civil Rights movement, followed by Wallace and white backlash, followed by the election of Barack Obama followed by the shooting of Trayvon Martin, followed by the acquittal of George Zimmerman, followed by the strangulation of Eric Garner — where’d he go, by the way? — and the shooting of Michael Brown. Maybe we should admit it to ourselves, we of the dwindling white majority, that the racial divide is something essential to holding our idea of the country together. It may be that we cannot unify ourselves without fashioning every 50 years or so, a new suit of clothes for old Jim Crow. White people will be a minority in this country, and very soon. Maybe the racial divide is all we have left.”

atane:

The above are the first 3 responses to Dr. Redmond’s spot on tweet. This is the boorish behavior that Black people have to deal with from white people for merely speaking out against white supremacy. The harassment from white people towards Black people is constant and virulent. If you’re a Black person speaking out against white supremacy, white people will attack you or at the very least, they will have a major problem with you. They will attack you more than a “good” white person saying the exact same thing. Tim Wise does not put up with an inkling of the abuse Black people endure and he isn’t saying anything new. Discourse about white supremacy from a white mouth is more palatable to the white masses than from the mouths of those victimized by white supremacy.

Ironically, the “good” white people become like the rest of their white brethren when they attempt to separate themselves by saying “not all white people”. They too become a nuisance that everlastingly badgers. They are largely silent about injustice, inequity and marginalization at the hands of white supremacy. However, the minute the marginalized speak out against their abusers, they are quick to lend a voice in defense of the abusers. It’s because even when white people are clearly abusers, other white people still see their humanity. In the face of this abuse, merely pointing out that the perpetrators of the abuse are white angers white people. The abuse itself doesn’t elicit the same level of anger from them.

Another problem are these alleged white liberals. Truth be told, I get more harassment from white liberals than from anyone else. White conservatives don’t hide their disdain for Blackness. For them, it’s a badge of honor. We know where they stand. White liberals in contrast tend to be silent, but will speak up to center themselves in a crisis or will be apologetic towards white abusers, instead of condemning them. Many will not acknowledge that white supremacy even exists. If they do acknowledge a problem, they will wrap it up in empty platitudes about everyone needing to get along, how they don’t see race, how we’re all human, how they have Black friends or whatever post-racial nonsense they ascribe to, as if that addresses white supremacy. They believe that the problem “goes both ways”.

If the above isn’t you as a white person, do not take this as your cue to respond with “not all white people”. As the saying goes, the hit dog will holler. If something does not apply to you, then why are you hollering? Did I hit you? Maybe I did. The only thing many white people can bring themselves to say in response to Black suffering and white supremacy is “not all white people” or "this is reverse racism" or their favorite chopped up MLK Jr. quote “hate cannot drive out hate”. The response from white people is never a unanimous “the system of white supremacy is a scourge that must end and we must fight to end it”. It is never that.

Whiteness will always justify the extermination of Blackness. Mike Brown was gunned down in Ferguson by officer Darren Wilson and the Ferguson police in turn releases video stills of what they claim to be Brown being an alleged criminal days after his murder. This was completely unrelated to his murder, but there is always a reason for dead Black bodies when whiteness governs. So why did they release these stills if the Ferguson police themselves have admitted that it is completely unrelated to Brown’s murder at the hands of officer Darren Wilson? They did it to smear his image. This is a tactic of white supremacy. It always smears the image of a Black victim.

When Black people are victimized and dehumanized, they still aren’t quite human in the eyes of many white people. At least not on the level of white humanity. It’s why a white terrorist like Dzhokhar Tsarnaev can be put on the cover of Rolling Stone, like he’s a heartthrob in a boy band, and be described as “popular and promising”, while unarmed Black people murdered by white people are criminalized in death. Their image gets smeared because full victimhood is relegated to whiteness. Innocence and chasteness will be awarded to a white murderer before a Black murder victim.

I don’t argue or engage with white people on this subject anymore. This Malcolm X quote is forever relevant. I’ll respond or say my piece if need be, but I won’t debate a white person about Black humanity. My response to “good” white folks will always be “go and get your people”. That’s all I have to say to them. Truly good white people don’t need to be told that. They know. Word to John Brown.

slavocracy:

white peoples solution to police brutality in the US is all black people should dress no less formally than business casual attire at all times

Oh snap

Oh snap

shatterfly:

trillgamesh:

supersaiyansickomobb:

young-thugger:

alannapplebum:

wtfwhiteppl:

white people stealing hashtags

so if you get gunned down

stop white people

This is horrific

this is legitimately evil

What the actual fuck?


Nope

shatterfly:

trillgamesh:

supersaiyansickomobb:

young-thugger:

alannapplebum:

wtfwhiteppl:

white people stealing hashtags

so if you get gunned down

stop white people

This is horrific

this is legitimately evil

What the actual fuck?

Nope

“Those who hate black skin shouldn’t police black men.”

lovelylavenderchild:

You cannot be racist to white people

just like you can’t fire your boss

because you don’t have that power

“All but 3 of America’s 185 wealthiest families are white.”

Anonymous asked

Oh my fucking god, singing with an accent isnt racist. If using a British accent isn't racist, why would using Jamaican accent be. You are racist. Your blog is overrated, and you are rude. Just because you are from a culture doesn't mean that you can't try to experience others, we live in a multicultural globalized world. Get over your fucking self.

yoisthisracist answered

"If using a British accent isn’t racist, why would using Jamaican accent be." - Yo, I know you’re dumb as fuck, but it actually is kind of hilarious that you picked literally a colonizer and their colony as your examples about how mimicking their accents is somehow identical. Guess what, you stupid asshole, maybe if white folks hadn’t raped and pillaged Jamaica (in this instance) for as long as humanly possible, it’d be a little less grating when your wack ass pulls out the white dreads on your acoustic guitar.

phaentom:

I had some choice thoughts about terrorism today

gjmueller:

The segregation of kindergartners — by the numbers

Here, from the non-profit Economic Policy Institute, is a snapshot of how segregated public schools are, starting in kindergarten. It was written by Elaine Weiss and Emma García. Weiss  has served as the national coordinator for the Broader, Bolder Approach to Education since 2011.  García, who joined the Economic Policy Institute in 2013, specializes in the economics of education and education policy.  EPI was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers.

gjmueller:

The segregation of kindergartners — by the numbers

Here, from the non-profit Economic Policy Institute, is a snapshot of how segregated public schools are, starting in kindergarten. It was written by Elaine Weiss and Emma García. Weiss  has served as the national coordinator for the Broader, Bolder Approach to Education since 2011. García, who joined the Economic Policy Institute in 2013, specializes in the economics of education and education policy.  EPI was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers.

“The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime.”

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

Think about who’s in jail and why. 

(via amerikkkan-stories)

and that “crime” could be anything they felt like charging you with

(via boygeorgemichaelbluth)

This was how the myth of Black criminality started, for the record. After the abolition of slavery, a lot of states made laws targeting Black people specifically, and then put them on chain gangs to get free labor from them.

Oh, and the US is still disproportionately incarcerating Black people and private prisons are making huge amounts off them.

(via bunnybotbaby)

This is one of those pieces of information I wish had like 200 million notes on tumblr.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

meanwhile the dea teamed up with the cca

(via cxnfvsed-and-cxnflicted)

Yeah, I believe that black people are twice as likely to be arrested and convicted for committing the same crimes as a white person. Draw your own conclusions.

(via yesiamtheblack)

Reblogging this because everytime in real life I’ve said Slavery didn’t really end I’ve been dismissed as crazy.

(via locsgirl)

I’ll reblog this every time it comes up on my dash. People need to know!

(via andshegotthegirl)

All of this.

(via thisiseverydayracism)

This week of summer camp is the American Revolution.  I just printed out the Preamble and the Bill of Rights, skimming the rest of the amendments for my amusement.

It stopped being amusing once I got to the 13th and started raging about the prison industrial complex we have in this country.

The kids (all girls) are only 8 and 9, but damn did they notice the irony of “all men are created equal” in the Declaration.  Too bad no one signed up for our Civil War week.

(via misandry-mermaid)