tamorapierce:

texasenchantment:

mediamattersforamerica:

How Fox News covered women’s issues this morning. 

*checks the date to make sure it is still 2014* 

Don’t even get me started on Faux Newsicle.

I like how the Do and Don’t have nothing to do with each other. After I read the “Do” I scrolled down expecting to see “Don’t: Wear revealing clothing” or whatever, but nope, it’s actually just “look good and be quiet”

mediumaevum:

This recipe taken from Forme of Curye, ab. 1390 A.D. (Pages 76v & 77r). The images are from the original manuscript as digitized by the John Rylands University Library and the 1780 printing edited by Samuel Pegge.

Tart in Ember Day

Take and parboil onions and herbs and press out the water and chop them small, take bread and pound it in a mortar and temper it with egg, do thereto butter, saffron and slat and raisins Corinth and a little sugar with fine powder and bake it in a shell and serve it forth.

Interpretation:

Bring pot of water to boil. Peel and quarter onions, place in boiling water for 2-3 minutes, then drain. Chop onions and parsley and combine with bread crumbs, eggs, butter, currants, sugar, salt, and spices. Pour into prepared pie crust and bake at 350°F for 30-40 minutes, ensuring that the egg is set. Let cool for 10-15 minutes before cutting into serving sizes.

For ingredients and more info visit the source.

wait

currants = “raisins [of] Corinth” !

I NEVER KNEW THIS

glitch-camaro asked

Hey mod, do you have any before/afters of unfucking your own habitat? Or do you just consistently keep it unfucked?

unfuckyourhabitat answered

I do have before and afters; I just don’t post them. I basically take pictures before and after any significant project. My house is usually unfucked in the “stop by whenever” sense, but I’m not going to lie to you all and tell you that it’s always pristine. I work three jobs (including UfYH), so time is sort of a finite commodity for me. (I mean, it is for everyone, but you know what I mean.)

I honestly don’t think that a naturally tidy person who has an immaculate house at all times could possibly understand the rest of us enough to work on developing a system that works for normal people with busy lives and the occasional lack of motivation or depressive episode or who have chronic illnesses or other limitations. So yeah, regular non-Martha person here just trying to help people like me (and not like me, too) get on track.

Over an 11-month period last year, 129 inmates [at Rikers] suffered “serious injuries” — ones beyond the capacity of doctors at the jail’s clinics to treat — in altercations with correction department staff members.

The report cataloged in exacting detail the severity of injuries suffered by inmates: fractures, wounds requiring stitches, head injuries and the like. But it also explored who the victims were. Most significantly, 77 percent of the seriously injured inmates had received a mental illness diagnosis.

In 80 percent of the cases, inmates reported being beaten after they were handcuffed… In five of the 129 cases, the beatings followed suicide attempts.

None of the officers involved in the 129 cases have been prosecuted at this point, according to information from the Bronx district attorney’s office. None have been brought up on formal administrative charges in connection to the cases so far either.


When the new Capitol Drive bridge was planned (it replaced a rickety wood-plank contraption so narrow there was scarcely room for two vehicles to pass), the city of Milwaukee asked Shorewood to share in the cost. The village categorically refused, pointing to its charter, which set the community’s boundary at the water’s edge and included no part of the river itself.
To Shorewood’s dismay, Milwaukee would remember this nifty piece of historical trivia and turn it against the village four years later.


How the 1927 Capitol Drive bridge saved part of the Milwaukee River

When the new Capitol Drive bridge was planned (it replaced a rickety wood-plank contraption so narrow there was scarcely room for two vehicles to pass), the city of Milwaukee asked Shorewood to share in the cost. The village categorically refused, pointing to its charter, which set the community’s boundary at the water’s edge and included no part of the river itself.

To Shorewood’s dismay, Milwaukee would remember this nifty piece of historical trivia and turn it against the village four years later.

How the 1927 Capitol Drive bridge saved part of the Milwaukee River

bombing:

fun drinking game: take a shot of water every couple hours to make sure you’re healthy and hydrated

reachmouse:

girlgotmuscle:

lilinternetwarrior:

theidledrifter:

jane-b-nimbel:

thesanityclause:

youngmanandoldsoul:

“Killed 99 bears”
a fact that if actually accomplished, should be put on a tombstone.

My favorite part is “We hope he has gone to rest.” What, like… they weren’t sure? Maybe, if ever the bear uprising should start again, he would rise from the ground to finish what he started and slay that 100th bear?Was this man so powerful they are concerned he might not have decided to rest at all and is simply biding his time?

The bears made that tombstone.
A warning, and a prayer.
That he really, truely stays down.

This is too badass not to reblog.

#i had 99 problems and they were all bears so i fucking killed them

Reblog for last comment

unseenphil . Right?

reachmouse:

girlgotmuscle:

lilinternetwarrior:

theidledrifter:

jane-b-nimbel:

thesanityclause:

youngmanandoldsoul:

“Killed 99 bears”

a fact that if actually accomplished, should be put on a tombstone.

My favorite part is “We hope he has gone to rest.” What, like… they weren’t sure? Maybe, if ever the bear uprising should start again, he would rise from the ground to finish what he started and slay that 100th bear?

Was this man so powerful they are concerned he might not have decided to rest at all and is simply biding his time?

The bears made that tombstone.

A warning, and a prayer.

That he really, truely stays down.

This is too badass not to reblog.

Reblog for last comment

unseenphil . Right?

We tend to revisit our prisons. And we always go back.

[…]

I’m in the suburb of my mind. I’m in the farm town of my mind. I’m in the childhood bedroom of my mind. I think every writer stands in the doorway of their prison. Half in, half out. The very act of storytelling is a return to the prison of what torments us and keeps us captive, and writers are repeat offenders. You go through this whole journey with your prison, revisiting it in your mind. Hopefully, you get to a point when you realize there was beauty in your prison, too.

necrophilofthefuture:

Meet Pickles, aka “Catosaurus.” He was rescued in Boston and he’s over 3 feet long.

I like how he’s just hanging there like “they’re taking pictures to put on the internet aren’t they”

necrophilofthefuture:

Meet Pickles, aka “Catosaurus.” He was rescued in Boston and he’s over 3 feet long.

I like how he’s just hanging there like “they’re taking pictures to put on the internet aren’t they”

alisso:

notemily:

k-b-rock:

sententiola:

Sometimes I think about how many little things we probably do every day that would totally mess up the reasoning of a Sherlock-Holmes-style detective.

Like the other day we went to the cinema and I was wearing a shirt with no pockets so I put the ticket in my trouser pocket.  The next day I was wearing the same trousers and I put my hand in my pocket and found the ticket there.

Now, I have a certain selection of things I always have in my trouser pockets and I don’t really like having anything else in there because it confuses my hands when I want to get something, so I took the ticket out.  And I wasn’t near a rubbish bin, but I was wearing a shirt with a breast pocket.  So I put the ticket in the shirt pocket.

And I thought: if I get interestingly murdered, the Sherlock-Holmes-style detective is going to deduce that I’m wearing the same shirt that I wore yesterday.  Because it’s got a cinema ticket in the pocket with yesterday’s date on, and why on earth would anyone put a cinema ticket in the pocket of a shirt unless they were wearing the shirt when they went to the cinema?

Which is a bit of reasoning we would all find totally convincing if it came from a Sherlock-Holmes-style detective.  But it would be wrong.  Because actually there are so many other explanations for things once you take account of the fact that people are often slightly eccentric in completely trivial and unguessable ways.

“Samuel Vimes dreamed about Clues. He had a jaundiced view of Clues. He instinctively distrusted them. They got in the way. And he distrusted the kind of person who’d take one look at another man and say in a lordly voice to his companion, “Ah, my dear sir, I can tell you nothing except that he is a left-handed stonemason who has spent some years in the merchant navy and has recently fallen on hard times,” and then unroll a lot of supercilious commentary about calluses and stance and the state of a man’s boots, when exactly the same comments could apply to a man who was wearing his old clothes because he’d been doing a spot of home bricklaying for a new barbecue pit, and had been tattooed once when he was drunk and seventeen* and in fact got seasick on a wet pavement. What arrogance! What an insult to the rich and chaotic variety of the human experience!”

—Terry Pratchett, Feet of Clay

also applies to csi-type shows where they’re like “ah yes this bit of orange thread on the carpet means the murderer was wearing an orange shirt”

like do you know how much random shit is ground into my carpet right now

* These terms are often synonymous.

(Was missing the footnote *G*)

ah yes very important

Namely, what is the future of work?

It’s important to realize that in some sense we’ve been here before. When all the farming equipment got super efficient and we lost agricultural jobs by the thousands, people swarmed to the cities and we started building things with manufacturing. So if before we had “the age of the farm,” we then entered into “the age of stuff.” And I don’t know about you but I have LOTS of stuff.

Now that all the robots have been trained and are being trained to build our stuff for us, what’s next? What age are we entering?

I kind of want to complain at this point that economists are kind of useless when it comes to questions like this. I mean, aren’t they in charge of understanding the economy? Shouldn’t they have the answer here? I don’t think they have explained it if they do.

I hope the future of work lies in realizing that a person’s value and worth as a person has nothing to do with what kind of work they are able to do, but I’m not that optimistic about it.

"Universal basic income," whispers the idealist in me. "Universal health care. The end of poverty." But the rest of me knows it won’t happen in my lifetime, if it ever happens at all.